Jilara (jilara) wrote,
Jilara
jilara

  • Mood:

Idiots who write articles

I am now wondering exactly what sorts of standards (low, presumably) it takes to get an article published, nowadays. At least, in something other than a huge major publication (or maybe even those---I tend not to read huge major publications). But then, I see the sort of bogus crap that gets aired all the time on the History Channel, without anyone opening a book to verify a purported "fact," and realize maybe I expect too much of the modern media.

I encounter this junk every day. The latest that made me go "Whaaa??" was an article on buying jewelery in a travel magazine. You know, "invest at the source" and stuff like that. In this, I learned that you can determine if a pearl has been dyed by seeing if the color rubs off on your skin (?!), and that "for gems like rubies or emeralds, you shouldn't pay more that $10-20 for stones that aren't transparent." (Presumably like window glass?) Wow, that was a blanket statement.

Wow, those dyed pearls must have been dyed recently, presumably in the back room... Seriously, a good quality dyed pearl isn't going to rub off dye under normal wear, let alone if you're rubbing it on you in the jewelery store. (For the record, most "black" pearls are dyed, and they can still be fairly high quality. Pearls really need an expert to judge some of them.) And as for those rubies and emeralds, emeralds naturally include inclusions and usually are translucent rather than transparent. That's why I love them---they have character. Synthetics are transparent. You can spend hundreds to thousands of dollars for an eye-clean natural specimen of any reasonable size. I think this person has figured that the opposite of "opaque" is "transparent," without bothering to educate themself on what real gems are actually like. Most those "transparent" stones are actually synthetics (which aren't even mentioned). And I'm *still* working on the part about North Carolina being a good source of high quality emeralds! (I know they've found them there, but in terms of emeralds, what comes to mind is Columbia, Zambia, and Brazil...) It read like someone's school paper. (Maybe it *was* someone's school paper!) I know I made a few awful bloopers when I was trying to write articles, back when I was in high school ("there are virtually no poisonous Boletes..." when there is, of course, Boletus satanicus, though not in California!).

I've really got to start writing magazine articles again, in self-defense. I shouldn't complain unless I'm doing something to help remedy the situation.
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    Anonymous comments are disabled in this journal

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

  • 3 comments